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cruciatetear

Holden with Arthritis and a Cruciate Tear

It’s about time we introduced everyone to Holden. Don’t let his handsome face and boyish charm fool you, this senior dog was seriously on the struggle bus earlier this year. We received a phone call in the early spring regarding Holden. He was not weight-bearing on the right hind leg due to a cruciate tear and because of his fourteen years, was not a candidate for cruciate ligament surgery. He also did not travel well because he was horribly arthritic and it was uncomfortable for him to be in the car. Basically, Holden was a mess, and his parents were besides themselves trying to figure out what they could do to help him along his journey.

 

Holden had lost a significant amount of muscle by the time we met him. His strong leg was already weakened and unstable because of how much he had to favor it, and his injured leg had hardly any strength at all. He was only putting the tip of his toes down and that was on every seven or eight steps. Holden didn’t want to sit, lay down, or play. The simplest tasks were becoming hard for him. We explained how chiropractic can often help facilitate healing of the knee and cruciate ligament and stabilize the injury in situations such as Holden’s. Not only would an adjustment regimen help the injured leg improve, but it would also help with his arthritis and the rest of his ailments.

 

Because of the severity of Holden’s injury, we saw him three weeks in a row and then every other week for an additional month. At the end of those seven weeks this pup was fully weight bearing, walking, running, and sitting without trouble. His lameness was no longer present and his strength had returned. This fourteen year old was acting more like a six year old and you’d never have known that a few months earlier it seemed like he may be on his last leg. Between chiropractic and good parenting, Holden has been able to live a much better quality of life and he’s made 2017 a great year. Hoping 2018 turns out even better as he continues to maintain his strength and excitement!

badback

Zuko the Rottie and his Bad Back

badbackCheck out Zuko- that handsomest rottie mix that we’ve ever seen. We may be a little partial…he’s certainly grown on us over the past several months and become part of the family. Zuko came in because he was dealing with a lot of limping after every adventure outside. He couldn’t play, run, or really do anything without having a bad limp afterward in addition to having some low back pain. Since mom and dad go to the chiropractor, they figured that might be exactly what he needed to get over this hump.

 

On Zuko’s first visit it was more or less love at first sight. He came bounding in with a huge grin on his face, and a limp on his back end. Though nothing appeared to be torn or injured, the darn limp was still there. After two adjustments Zuko’s limp had basically disappeared. Hard to believe but his energy level skyrocketed and he was totally ready to go retrieve some balls.

 

A few months after being adjusted Zuko injured his hind leg and was struggling to put full weight on it. Concerned that it might be a tear, his fur mom brought him in to get checked. Luckily for us it appeared that Zuko sprained his cruciate ligament, something that normally takes several weeks to a couple of months to heal. Within two weeks and two adjustments Zuko was back to normal. Inflammation was gone and his gait was perfectly normal. Once again our happy boy was back to his happy self!

back pain

Gibbi the Lab with Severe Back Pain

back painGibbi girl here is an adorable love. She is loving and kind, and when her fur mom noticed she was in severe back pain she knew something was wrong. Gibbi was hunched up, would cry when touched, and would move her backside away from you the minute you tried to pet her. She cried and yelped and was not herself whatsoever, her back pain was altering her mood and her actions.

 

At her first adjustment Gibbi was tentative, nervous, and clearly incredibly uncomfortable. Her skin twitched every time she was touched and her tail was tucked so far between her legs. You could actually see the pain on her face. Gibbi also deals with significant anxiety, and she is attached to her fur parents. Keeping all of this in mind, on her first visit we were careful to only push Gibbi a certain amount. When animals are in that severe of pain, whether back or neck, it is important to leave them with a great experience and not cause them any more discomfort.

 

After her first adjustment Gibbi was already showing serious signs of improvement. Though still nervous and painful, she was walking smoothly, the sensitivity was down, and she didn’t have her tail tucked quite as far. After several adjustments, Gibbi had returned to her normal self, and even improved upon the original. She was feeling so great that our girl was actually calm during a thunderstorm and fireworks, something she had always struggled with. Now when we see Gibbi, she greets us happily, wagging her tail and actually coming up to us to get petted. She’s happy as a clam and completely pain free thanks to her fur moms instinct that something wasn’t right!